Reflective practice

7 March 2014

I have two thoughts ahead of the first session of the course ACADPRAC 701.

First, is a question about the starting point of the course; reflective practice. It seems odd to start with what we–teachers, for want of a better word–do, rather that what the students do; i.e., learning. As Sotto (2010) says, “deciding how to teach without first studying how people learn is like giving an answer before one has heard the question”. Yes, reflection is a powerful mechanism for fostering ones own learning. So, I wonder if we are intended to ‘come to’ learning and what it is in our own way.

My second observation is on part of the description of this weeks seminar:

This session will explore conceptions of teaching as a “reflective practice” that benefits from repeated cycles of self-scrutiny, evaluation and change

Messers Argyris and Schön have given us many fine ideas including that of theory-of-action and theory-in-use. The former relates to what we think we do, the later is what others actually see us doing; and these may/are often different from one another. I might say that I like working in teams and value what they can achieve, but others may well observe that I am rather introverted and often seem to be happier and more productive when working alone.

The Joahri window is interesting in that regard. but neither really tell the complete story.

As something of an aside, the earliest reference I can find to the Johari Window (through Google n-gram view) is in 1960 and the Baltimore Bulletin of Education. It notes that the Johari Windows was named after Joe Luft and Harry Ingham back in 1955. Sixty years on, I wonder why we do not have a better model/framework. Anyway, if it is really that robust, I’d like to read the original–so I have asked the library for a copy.

References

Sotto, E. (2010, January 21). You can lecture, but can you teach? Times Higher Education. London. Retrieved from http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/features/you-can-lecture-but-can-you-teach/410056.article